The Topless Tower

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During Spanish Lit Month I reviewed Where There’s Love, There’s Hate by husband and wife Adolfo Bioy Casares and Silvina Ocampo This collaboration was my first acquaintance with Silvina Ocampo (who was a prolific writer but notoriously unavailable in English) and may well have been my last if I hadn’t fortuitously discovered that only a few years ago Hesperus Press had published a translation by James Womack of The Topless Tower. It is referred to in the introduction (co-authored by Marion Womack, hopefully another marital co-production) as “one of only two novels published during Ocampo’s lifetime” (the other being the, at that time, untranslated Where There’s Love, There’s Hate) but this is a rather generous description as, at 56 pages, I would be reluctant to call it a novella.

Ocampo edited The Book of Fantasy with Borges and Casares (it includes one of her stories) and most of her fiction was of that genre, including her children’s fiction. The Topless Tower uses many of the tropes of children’s literature from the fairy tale tower of the title to an appearance from Alice in Wonderland. James and Marion Womack suggest this is one reason why she is not better known:

“But one more answer to the question of why Silvina Ocampo is not better known is that large parts of her activity, her imaginative stories and plays and poetry, has to be filtered, or so it seems, through the unfairly marginalising label of ‘children’s writing’.”

It is certainly true that, although The Topless Tower contains many elements of a children’s fable, one senses a darker intelligence behind it. Consider, for example:

“Will the images we’ve seen through our lives remain in our eyes? Will we be like a modern camera, filled with little rolls of film; of course, rolls that don’t require to be developed? If I die before reaching my home, before seeing my mother who I love so much, will she get to see the photographic film stored inside me?”

The idea and voice here are childlike but there is a gothic imagination behind the image.

In the story a young boy, Leandro, laughs at the paintings of a man who appears at the garden gate offering them for sale, particularly one of a yellow, windowless tower. He immediately finds himself trapped in just such a tower where he finds a room with an easel and paints. He soon discovers that whatever he paints becomes reality. Initially he struggles to control this ability: branches become spiders; creepers become snakes. Above all he wants to paint his mother, which he feels will unlock his imprisonment and allow his return home, but this proves most difficult of all.

The story becomes a fable about growing up. He paints a bird and monkey as companions but loses them carelessly. Next he attempts a self-portrait (showing increasing self-awareness) which gives him another perspective, dismissing his lost pets: “You were talking about those two as if they were humans.” In his pursuit of his mother’s face he creates a young girl:

“It wasn’t his mother, but he didn’t feel much disappointment about this. He had fallen in love with the little girl he had painted by accident.”

His maturing is also seen in the way that underlined words, those he doesn’t understand (“I’ll underline the words I don’t understand” he says at the beginning), increasingly disappear from the narrative.

The Topless Tower is a strange story, flickering between light and shade, but one that does haunt the memory. It does seem very slight for stand-alone publication, and would be better as part of a selected stories – one can only hope that might one day appear.

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12 Responses to “The Topless Tower”

  1. Amateur Reader (Tom) Says:

    Jan. 2015: http://www.nybooks.com/books/imprints/classics/thus-were-their-faces/

  2. jacquiwine Says:

    I’ve already made a note of Thus Were Their Faces (from Tom’s link) – one to look forward to. The gothic darkness of her stories sounds right up my street. Thank you for the review!

  3. winstonsdad Says:

    Sounds great I read the joint novel a couple of years ago and enjoyed it seems like same playful twist of traditional form like the joint novel did with classic crime novel

  4. naomifrisby Says:

    I’ve never heard of Ocampo before but this sounds great. I’m adding her to my list.

    • 1streading Says:

      I must admit I’d never heard of her until I read Where There’s Love, There’s Hate. And I would never have heard of Casares without Borges. It’s amazing how one writer can lead to another.

  5. kaggsysbookishramblings Says:

    Excellent! I follow Hesperus’s output but missed this one. I do feel the need to read this soon…!

    • 1streading Says:

      I only found it because I’d read Where There’s Love… and was looking to see if anything else by Ocampo had been translated. You should be able to pick up a copy fairly easily though.

  6. Max Cairnduff Says:

    Marvellous. Is this in the new collection do you know?

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